Cryopreservation of sperm cells and fertilized egg cells

Cryopreservation stops the metabolic processes of sperm cells and embryos and keeps them in a viable state at a temperature of -196 °C. This is a proven method that is routinely applied by our laboratory.

Cryopreservation of sperm cells

With permission, sperm cells can be frozen and used for an IVF treatment at a later date. The reasons for cryopreservation can be varied. If a testicular disorder is expected or chemotherapy becomes necessary we urge you to consider measures that would still make it possible to conceive a child at a later date as male fertility can be limited as a result.

Reasons for cryopreservation of sperm cells

If a testicular disorder is expected or chemotherapy becomes necessary.
We urge you to consider measures that would still make it possible to conceive a child at a later date, as male fertility can be limited as a result.

In cases where the partner may not be present during the treatment due to professional reasons cryopreservation may be beneficial.
If the treatment is scheduled the frozen sperm can be thawed at the desired time and used for fertilization.

In the case of azoospermia.
The option for cryopreservation of sperm cells surgically obtained through a testicular puncture procedure exists. These sperm cells can be used for a later fertility treatment. In some cases, several samples containing sperm cells are obtained. As a result, some of these can be frozen and stored for years without diminishing their quality. These are then available for further treatments.

Cryopreservation of fertilized egg cells (embryos)
The cryopreservation of embryos takes place in the morula or blastocyte stage with the aid of vitrification. In this process, the embryos are placed into a special medium which is transformed into an amorphous and glassy composition through rapid cooling. The forming of ice crystals is prevented so that there is no damage to the embryo. Based on our experience, embryos have different sensitivities and reactions to cryopreservation and the subsequent thawing. It cannot be guaranteed that an embryo will survive the process. The average survival rate of good quality embryos is about 90%. The pregnancy rate, as compared to non-frozen embryos, is only minimally lower.